Monthly Archives: December 2014

How AuthorAID offers you the chance to be a mentor
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In an article published on the Wiley Exchanges blog last week, INASP’s AuthorAID director Julie Walker explains the AuthorAID mentoring process and how learned societies can encourage their members to get involved At this time of year, many of us turn our thoughts to how we can make positive changes in our lives and the lives of others. Some of us long to provide practical help and support, but feel we lack the necessary skills or time commitment. For experienced researchers, editors and librarians there is a great way that you can give practical, hands-on support to others and one that doesn’t need to take up a lot of your time or require you to travel. You can support a researcher in a developing country through INASP’s AuthorAID project. The support and advice of people who are more experienced in research communication can make a huge difference in helping these researchers … Continue reading

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“Evidence-informed policy making is still a very new concept for a lot of policy makers in Zimbabwe”
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In an interview with Research to Action, Ronald Munatsi, Director of the Zimbabwe Evidence-Informed Policy Network (ZeipNet) discusses the role of ZeipNet in facilitating the inclusion of evidence into policy-making processes in Zimbabwe. ZeipNET is one of INASP’s partners, working on the VakaYiko consortium. In this interview with Research to Action, Ronald discusses the structures that currently exist in Zimbabwe to support evidence-informed policy making (EIPM), highlighting that EIPM is still a very new concept for many policy makers in the country. Part of the interview discusses the gap that still exists with regards to robust research evidence within Zimbabwe. Work is being carried out within think tanks and other institutions but there is a lack of coordination between the various think tanks or research institutions and the Ministries. Ronald describes how ZeipNET is looking at ways of trying to coordinate policy-making institutions, research institutions and think tanks. He also … Continue reading

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Bringing African research out of the shadows – Part 3
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In the third and final blog in this series, Miriam Conteh-Morgan, Head Librarian, Institute of Public Administration and Management, University of Sierra Leone, wraps up her discussion on the routes for researchers to improve visibility of their research and tips on how researchers can use 2.0 technologies to bring their findings and ideas into the global academic conversations Visibility through greater representation in the global research community and recognition of one’s (or in this case, a continent’s) contribution to knowledge production are basic to measuring scholarly impact, and these are more easily achievable these days because of new media. The subtitle of a book by John Hagel, John Seely Brown and Lang Davison — The power of pull: How small moves, smartly made, can set big things in motion – captures the essence of what researchers in Africa can do to join global academic conversations. “Pull,” the authors argue, is … Continue reading

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A Q&A with Sue Corbett, Executive Director of INASP, part II
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Last week, the Wiley Exchanges blog posted two interviews with INASP’s Executive Director Sue Corbett. We share those interviews in this post and the previous one. (The Wiley Exchanges version of part 2 is here). Here we continue our interview with Sue Corbett, Executive Director of INASP. In part I yesterday, we learned how and why INASP is working to improve accessibility to research in the developing world. More below on the success of the program and how you may be able to help. Q. Can you share a success story or two about the outcomes of INASP initiatives? A. An exciting new venture that illustrates some of the ways that publishers can be involved is a collaborative project that we are doing with Elsevier, VSO and a local partner COSTECH. The aim of this project is to train local publishers in Tanzania to strengthen local academic publishing across Tanzania … Continue reading

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Putting research knowledge at the center of development: a Q&A with Sue Corbett of INASP, Part I
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Last week, the Wiley Exchanges blog posted two interviews with INASP’s Executive Director Sue Corbett. We share those interviews in this post and the next. (The Wiley Exchanges version of part 1 is here). It’s easy to take access to research, and all that comes with it, for granted in the developed world, but as this interview with Sue Corbett, Executive Director of INASP, reminds us, there’s still much work to do in improving access and services for researchers in developing countries.  INASP plays a critical role in this, so that countries can solve their own development challenges. Q. Can you tell us about your background and how and why you got involved with INASP? A. My first career was in scientific publishing and I spent almost 30 years at Blackwell Publishing and then at Wiley.  I enjoyed it immensely and it’s great now to have an opportunity to greet some of my ex-colleagues and … Continue reading

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JOLs platforms provide gateway to Southern HIV/AIDS research – part 4: Living with HIV/AIDS
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On World AIDS Day, Andy Nobes takes a look at some recent research into HIV/AIDS from Southern researchers Today is World AIDS Day. HIV/AIDS is a pressing issue for many of the countries in which INASP works. It is also a significant focus for research in these countries. This series of posts share a selection of recent research on the topic from the Journals Online (JOLs) platforms. The first post looked at some research in the area of public knowledge and education about HIV and AIDS. The second post looked at research into the broader health implications of HIV/AIDS, the complications and the effectiveness of different approaches to treatment. The third post looked at a range of research into the disease, its prevalence and potential treatment. In this final post we share some recent research into living with HIV/AIDS. (Some articles on the AJOL platform may not be open access. … Continue reading

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