Multipliers training in the TESCEA partnership.

Transferring skills and knowledge for scale-up and sustainability

Tabitha Buchner discusses the role of “multipliers” in ensuring that work to transform higher education continues and grows beyond the lifetime of the TESCEA partnership.

Building sustainability of self-supporting communities: INASP’s approaches

Joanna Wild discusses why vibrant, sustainable communities of practice are not straightforward - and what we can do about it

Veronica Munuve of Uganda Martyrs University.

Experience of implementing course redesign to help students gain critical thinking skills

Veronica Munuve is a lecturer in the Faculty of Education at Uganda Martyrs University (UMU) and the university’s course redesign coordinator for the Transforming Education for Social Change in East Africa (TESCEA) partnership. She spoke to Tabitha Buchner about how curriculum redesign can help ensure that university students gain critical thinking skills through their studies.

Stakeholder Dinner at Gulu University.

Transforming learning and connecting communities to support higher education

David Monk of Gulu University in Uganda reports on a meal that brought together university staff and students with employers and members of the community to help forge closer links between university studies and employability

TESCEA course redesign workshop.

Reflecting on a year of partnership to boost higher education in East Africa

Significant change often seems hard to achieve in higher education – but in the last year, Transforming Employability for Social Change in East Africa (TESCEA) – a partnership of East African organizations and INASP – have had some real successes. Jon Harle reflects on the key elements of the partnership

How to bring gender-responsive pedagogy into course redesign in higher education

Aloysius Tenywa Malagala represented Gulu University, Uganda in a recent meeting about ensuring gender-responsive pedagogy in course redesign within the TESCEA project. In this blog post, he shares some of his reflections about gender issues in course redesign and how they fit with wider gender mainstreaming work within his university.

1 2 3 7