Tag Archives: Research

Evidence Spotlight: The Use of Evidence in Public Health Policy Making in Zimbabwe
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Onesimo Maguwu tells that there need to be some way of making the ‘messages’ more relevant to the policymakers for evidence-based policy in health care. Continue reading

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Who drives research in developing countries?
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This piece was previously published on Jon Harle’s Medium blog site, republished here with his permission. To what extent is research on development issues done by researchers in developing countries? To what extent do those researchers actually decide what research needs doing and what questions need asking? And if developing country researchers do decide, to what extent do they do so in collaboration with the people who might ultimately have a use for that knowledge ? These aren’t new questions, but they re-emerged for me recently in a series of studies we commissioned of research and knowledge systems in Somalia and Somaliland, Liberia and South Sudan. And they’re echoed in a series of essays on the ethics and politics of knowledge production in fragile states. It’s a well-worn maxim that appropriate solutions require local knowledge. Yet although this is well recognized, it often seems to be missing when research is commissioned … Continue reading

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The EIPM Toolkit: An open resource for practitioners and civil servants in developing countries
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Emily Hayter from the INASP EIPM team explains how the VakaYiko Evidence-Informed Policy Making Toolkit can be used as a resource material by civil servants, researchers and trainers independently, and without any prior training. Continue reading

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Knowledge into policy: Going beyond “Context matters”
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In an article first published in the Politics and Ideas blog, Vanesa Weyrauch shares her experience of writing a new study Going beyond “Context matters”, that aims to promote the use of knowledge into policy. This framework is written in collaboration with INASP. Continue reading

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Research and knowledge systems in difficult places part 3: Somalia and Somaliland
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In the last few weeks we’ve been exploring what we’re learning about doing research and using evidence in “difficult places”. We’ve introduced new papers on South Sudan and Liberia. Today we turn to the Somali regions. Looking beyond the headlines Somali has become almost synonymous with the term “failed state”, and Somalis have certainly suffered years of conflict and hardship. But the label of failed state, and the stories of war and refugees disguise a region of complex, adaptive and resilient political, social and economic systems. Similarly, there is more going on in research and higher education than I’d certainly imagined. In our latest viewpoints paper, Faduma Abukar Mursal considers the South-Central and Puntland regions of Somalia, while Abdullahi Odowa explores the situation in the self-declared Republic of Somaliland. Jason Mosley provides an introductory piece of political analysis, which places the subsequent accounts of the research and knowledge systems in … Continue reading

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Research and knowledge systems in difficult places part 2: Liberia
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In April, we published a blog post featuring South Sudan, introducing the first of a series of new papers on research and knowledge systems in “difficult places”. Around 4000 miles west of Juba, hugging the Atlantic coast of the continent is Liberia, which is the subject of our next post. While South Sudan is the world’s newest state, Liberia is Africa’s oldest republic, independent since 1847. But when we chose Liberia we weren’t tracing a simple conflict or crisis theme. Instead, with strong partnerships in Ghana, and new projects in Sierra Leone, it was a logical next step for INASP to consider working in Liberia. Common threads Of course, as countries which have both suffered many years of violence, there are some obvious, if superficial, similarities between Liberia and South Sudan – both are slowly rebuilding basic infrastructure and developing new institutions, and both lost many people during these crises, … Continue reading

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