Students at Mzumbe University

Untangling the impact of gender in the ‘hidden curriculum’

How university classes are taught can perpetuate unhelpful gender messages. Jennifer Chapin discusses the challenge and how a new framework for gender-responsive pedagogy can help.

Students in University of Dodoma.

How do we address the higher education gender gap?

Gender-responsive pedagogy can play an important role in supporting higher-education institutions to produce students who go on to become gender-responsive professionals, leaders and citizens, and to play a critical role in addressing inequalities and building a more equitable future. Jennifer Chapin shares some thoughts for how this can be achieved from two new papers.

People interacting at a face-to-face workshop

Pivoting to remote support for transforming higher education: what we have learnt

Tabitha Buchner and Josie Dryden reflect on feedback and lessons learnt from an online course to support higher education transformation in East Africa – and look ahead to how these lessons are feeding into future developments.

Students at Uganda Martyrs University.

How to make university classes more gender responsive

If changes to higher education are to achieve their objectives fully they need to be inclusive of all students. Mai Skovgaard shares what some university teaching staff in Tanzania and Uganda are doing to make their classes more gender responsive.

Coffee plant.

How social entrepreneurs are contributing to higher-education change in East Africa

A key component of ensuring students leave university with appropriate skills for employment when they graduate is fostering links with employers. Vincent Otieno Odhiambo, Regional Director of Ashoka East Africa in Kenya, shares some examples of how social entrepreneurs are providing that link in supporting the Transforming Employability for Social Change in East Africa (TESCEA) partnership.

Adapting for sustainability: taking training of trainers online to continue higher education support

At the mid-point in what should have been a face-to-face workshop to strengthen future facilitators and mentors of course redesign in East African universities, Tabitha Buchner and Josie Dryden share how this work has been adapted for an online environment.

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