Author Archives: Sue Corbett

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About Sue Corbett

Sue Corbett is the Executive Director at INASP.

Goodbye from Sue Corbett
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As Sue Corbett comes to the end of her time as Executive Director she shares some personal reflections from the past four years. Continue reading

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The Wisdom of Crowds – Part 2
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In her second post of the week, Sue Corbett shares some of the ways that INASP is bringing people together to share ideas and support research systems development. Continue reading

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The wisdom of crowds – Part 1
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In the first of a two-part blog, Sue Corbett reflects on INASP’s work to encourage collective problem solving at a national level. Continue reading

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Insights into the state of research systems in developing countries – Part Two
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In May 2015, as part of INASP’s strategy development process, we engaged an independent consultant to conduct a phone/skype survey of 39 stakeholders from 26 countries who represent different parts of the research and development system. In yesterday’s blog post, Sue Corbett shared some of the positive messages that emerged from the survey about the progress of research in the south. In today’s blog she looks at the persistence of “old problems” and complex challenges. As discussed in yesterday’s blog, there have been many positive signs in the development of southern research systems – more equal north-south partnerships, growth in higher education and academic research and an increasing presence of research evidence amongst policymakers, to name a few. However, significant challenges remain in the creation of a culture and enabling environment for research in the south. One root cause is that the increased funding is nowhere near enough to support … Continue reading

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Insights into the state of research systems in developing countries – Part One
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In May 2015, as part of INASP’s strategy development process, we engaged an independent consultant, Teresa Hanley, to conduct a phone/Skype survey of 39 stakeholders from 26 countries who represent different parts of the research and development system. Survey respondents included researchers, research and programme managers, senior university personnel, librarians, journal editors, capacity builders and donors. They work in universities, government departments, NGOs, think tanks, foundations and other parts of civil society. Some knew INASP well and others less so, but we considered them to be thought leaders in the sector. Respondents were generous with their time and views and we gained many useful pointers for our future strategy at INASP. But some more general key messages emerged about what is happening across the global south in the production, communication and use of research in the global south which we are keen to share widely in this two-part blog. First, … Continue reading

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Generating and using research knowledge in Malawi
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Sue Corbett shares some of INASP’s experience and observations about Malawi’s research system based on a recent visit and many years of working in the country.   Think of Malawi, and you might think of vivid green tea plantations or a sparkling freshwater lake. You probably wouldn’t think about its research and knowledge system – strained, but still alive with new ideas and energy to ensure research is at the service of Malawi’s development. In March a colleague and I made a five-day visit to Malawi, jointly with a couple of our Malawian partners. It was one of a series of visits that INASP staff members are doing to assess the conditions in our partner countries, discuss progress in current projects and understand readiness for further support in strengthening various elements of the research and knowledge “ecosystem”. Malawi is a small, poor country. 60% of its population relies on subsistence … Continue reading

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