Improving public service delivery, efficiency and accountability requires that government agencies can use evidence more effectively

In this post, Emily Hayter, Leandro Echt and Clara Richards share reflections from two evidence diagnostic exercises (one in Pakistan and the other in Uganda) undertaken as part of the Strengthening Evidence Use for Development Impact (SEDI) programme.

Brick pattern.

Understanding the space for change: integrating a ‘Triple A’ lens into a political economy analysis

Undertaking a political economy analysis of focus countries and sectors is a common practice in development projects. But our aim in the Strengthening the use of Evidence for Development Impact (SEDI) programme was to add a further layer of insight by asking: what is the space for change in the actual organisations we will work with? 

Moving beyond “the norm” for capacity development

Global thought leaders in evidence-informed policy recently came together to discuss the most significant lessons learnt about capacity development for evidence use, as well as how the sector needs to evolve to in order to adapt more effectively to a different set of global challenges. Emily Hayter shares some key themes.

Tea fields.

Capacity development for evidence use – sharing the SEDI principles

Working in partnership with country governments, the SEDI programme aims to develop capacity and promote innovation in increasing evidence-informed decision making in Uganda, Ghana and Pakistan. Emily Hayter discusses the capacity development principles that underpin the way this programme operates.

Image of Brasilia with Brazil flag.

Improving the culture of evidence-informed decision-making in the Brazilian public sector

How can the culture of evidence-informed decision-making be improved in the Brazilian public sector? Davi Romão discusses some findings from using the Context Matters framework to consider this question.

Three things we have learned about political economy analysis – and some unanswered questions

In the second of this two-part series, we reflect on what we have learned, the challenges we faced and questions we are asking ourselves as we continue to integrate Political Economy Analysis into our project work.

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