Tag Archives: Policy

Policy and financial commitments to research in Africa, Asia and Latin America
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By Martin Belcher and Sara Gwynn A recent Royal Society review of global scientific collaboration9 notes that “the challenge of measuring the value of science… faces all the scientific community” p25. For INASP part of measuring this value is in considering the inputs into science, and in particular research, in developing and emerging countries. Understanding if and how financial and policy commitments to research change over time might offer us some useful indicators of the health of the research sector in the countries that we work with and help us in our work to tailor research capacity support to each country’s context. We are particularly interested in understanding these issues in the context of developments over the last 10 years and then looking forward to the next 10. How has the environment changed since INASP has been working extensively in research sector strengthening? What are the wider trends and likely … Continue reading

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From open access to openness
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This post was written by Jörgen Eriksson. Jörgen is the manager of the Department of Scientific Communication at Lund University Library.  I attended the Berlin10 conference in Stellenbosch, South Africa, 6-8 November, 2012 thanks to funding from INASP.  It turned out to be a very successful and well organized event and here I provide a summary of some highlights and key arguments. Pre-workshop on “Open access policy development and advocacy” To summarise the four case studies presented at the pre-workshop on “Open access policy development and advocacy” could be done in a few words: Team effort! Slow progress!

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What caught our eye last week
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An agreement, a promise, a case study and some recommendations make up our round-up of some of the most interesting links we encountered over the past week.

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What caught our eye last week
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An interesting article on the BBC news looks at how some entrepreneurs from East Africa are using mobile apps as loyalty cards that are easily tied to social media and require only a standard text to use – no smartphone necessary!  See ‘Kenyan and Ugandan start-ups make location pay its way’ (Fiona Graham, BBC). Caroline Wagner (SciDev.Net) looks at the challenge of making the outcomes of scientific research (especially publications) available to all potential users. See ‘Uncovering the world’s ‘unseen’ science’. ‘“Developing” countries arrested development’ (Hector Torres, Project Syndicate)  is a somewhat controversial article on the possibility of revising the group of countries defined as “emerging” and subject to a less restricted regime by the WTO. As a similar point of interest, our own Rebecca Bailey recently posted ‘How do you measure development?’, which questions whether HDI and GNI are good indicators of a country’s development. Finally, Simon McGrath wrote … Continue reading

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Is well communicated research-evidence the panacea to evidence-informed policy making?
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“How do I make my research relevant to policy?” I believe this should be an imperative question for any empirical (perhaps, also theoretical) researcher. Some researchers/scientists won’t probably agree with me, fearing that my statement implies some sort of pollution brought by the cynic political logic into the pure and linear research process. However, as a professional interested in evidence informed policy making (EIPM) and a social scientist, I believe that research and politics can find a common ground in their higher conceptions – respectively intended as a social mission and art of mediation between different interests resulting in the best possible solution for the society.

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