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Open access – INASP Blog
Rangoli picture representing open access.

Open Access: challenges and opportunities for LMICs and the potential impact of UK policy

In late 2019, INASP was commissioned by three UK funders to undertake a consultation to understand the challenges and opportunities that open access presents to low- and middle-income country stakeholders.

Raising awareness of Open Access in the Global South

Since we were founded 25 years ago, INASP has been a strong advocate – both publicly and privately – for the importance of access to research and knowledge and its role in sustainable development. Open Access promises to increase the availability of essential information for researchers. We see strong support for this from many researchers but also continued confusion and lack of awareness.

INASP Annual review 2016-17

Annual review highlights successes of INASP’s 5 year strategy

Julie Brittain, INASP Executive Director, looks back at the past year and shares some highlights from our latest annual review....

Humphrey Kombe Keah on access to research, the SDGs and challenges in Kenya

Humphrey Kombe Keah is an Information Management and Digital Services Specialist at the World Agroforestry Centre in Nairobi, Kenya.  He...

The EIPM Toolkit: An open resource for practitioners and civil servants in developing countries

Emily Hayter from the INASP EIPM team explains how the VakaYiko Evidence-Informed Policy Making Toolkit can be used as a resource material by civil servants, researchers and trainers independently, and without any prior training.

Openness is good but not simple

Openness is good but not simple

Julie Brittain reflects on openness and what it means in the context of INASP's work.

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