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TESCEA – INASP Blog

In Uganda, education students are bringing new ideas about learning into local schools

18 months on, the change seeded by the TESCEA programme – a partnership to transform the relevance and quality of learning and improve the prospects for young people in East Africa – continues to grow. We recently talked to Albert from Uganda Martyrs University, a TESCEA partner university.

Logo for the TESCEA model.

Transforming Higher Education for Social Change – a model from East Africa to support significant learning and transformation

Working with partners in Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya, we are pleased to share a new scalable pedagogical model to support lecturers and institutions in low resource settings to transform their teaching and learning practices.

Students at Mzumbe University

Untangling the impact of gender in the ‘hidden curriculum’

How university classes are taught can perpetuate unhelpful gender messages. Jennifer Chapin discusses the challenge and how a new framework for gender-responsive pedagogy can help.

Students in University of Dodoma.

How do we address the higher education gender gap?

Gender-responsive pedagogy can play an important role in supporting higher-education institutions to produce students who go on to become gender-responsive professionals, leaders and citizens, and to play a critical role in addressing inequalities and building a more equitable future. Jennifer Chapin shares some thoughts for how this can be achieved from two new papers.

People interacting at a face-to-face workshop

Pivoting to remote support for transforming higher education: what we have learnt

Tabitha Buchner and Josie Dryden reflect on feedback and lessons learnt from an online course to support higher education transformation in East Africa – and look ahead to how these lessons are feeding into future developments.

Students at Uganda Martyrs University, young woman in foreground, two young men and one young woman in backhground

How to make university classes more gender responsive

If changes to higher education are to achieve their objectives fully they need to be inclusive of all students. Mai Skovgaard shares what some university teaching staff in Tanzania and Uganda are doing to make their classes more gender responsive.

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